ITS JUST ME

I stole almost everything

451 notes

newyorker:

Marina Harss on the ballerina Wendy Whelan, who will retire from New York City Ballet on Saturday night:

"At forty-seven, she seems to care less about how things look than about the way they work and what they say. There’s a kind of no-bull attitude to her dancing that cuts through the posturing and the ornamentation that can sometimes be off-putting about ballet."

Photograph by Beatrice de Gea/The New York Times/Redux

newyorker:

Marina Harss on the ballerina Wendy Whelan, who will retire from New York City Ballet on Saturday night:

"At forty-seven, she seems to care less about how things look than about the way they work and what they say. There’s a kind of no-bull attitude to her dancing that cuts through the posturing and the ornamentation that can sometimes be off-putting about ballet."

Photograph by Beatrice de Gea/The New York Times/Redux

Filed under this is so cool

2,958 notes

Stop worrying about your identity and concern yourself with the people you care about, ideas that matter to you, beliefs you can stand by, tickets you can run on. Intelligent humans make those choices with their brain and hearts and they make them alone. The world does not deliver meaning to you. You have to make it meaningful…and decide what you want and need and must do. It’s a tough, unimaginably lonely and complicated way to be in the world. But that’s the deal: you have to live; you can’t live by slogans, dead ideas, clichés, or national flags. Finding an identity is easy. It’s the easy way out.
Zadie Smith, On Beauty  (via aminaabramovic)

(Source: literaryjukebox.brainpickings.org, via carmenrios)

759 notes

Despair is a much more dangerous feeling than fear, because fear is an intense feeling and, even if it can be momentarily paralyzing, in the end it calls for action, and, surprisingly, it can also create solutions. But despair is a feeling that calls for passivity and acceptance of reality even if it is unbearable, and it sees every spark of hope, every desire for change as a cunning enemy.
Etgar Keret, in an exchange with Sayed Kashua on Israel’s condition. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)